STDS AND HIV/AIDS: USING A VARIETY OF APPROACHES TO FIGHT ON ALL FRONTS

THE FIGHT AGAINST HIV/AIDS IS BEARING FRUIT WITH A STEADY DECREASE IN THE NUMBER OF DEATHS AND OF NEWLY-INFECTED PERSONS. HOWEVER, PROGRESS IS STILL PRECARIOUS

Sub-saharan Africa, with 69% of the new infections, remains the area the most affected by the epidemic. It is in this region, and specifically in Guinea and Mali, that we have concentrated our efforts for more than 20 years. 

In close collaboration with our many African partners, we have been actively involved since the early 1990s in the struggle to reduce the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases in the general population. To this end, we began by developing a very wide range of approaches taking into account the conditions that contribute to transmission, such as risky sexual behaviours, unequal power relationships between men and women, and the lack of sufficient health services to combat the epidemic. Thus, we have focused our efforts on sex workers, their clients, persons with multiple sex partners, and young people gravitating around areas of prostitution and other high-risk settings.

A FEW NUMBERS  (in Guinea and Mali):

Trained 2,766 professionals:
healthcare providers, NGO representatives, group facilitators and peer educators

Supported more than 300 organizations in:

o training staff and collecting, analyzing and disseminating the results of basic STD surveillance data;
o implementing 15 services adapted to the needs of sex workers;
o carrying out micro projects that, in themselves, reached more than 300,000 people

15,673 sex workers visited the adapted services between 2002 and 2005, of whom 5,769 were diagnosed with an STD;

More than 200,000 STDs were diagnosed and treated by healthcare facilities between 2001 and 2005.


Follow us

Our approach

  • Collaborate closely with national authorities to improve training and monitoring tools;
  • Make actions sustainable by training pools of trainers and supervisors;
  • Carry out operational research to better understand the environment, target interventions appropriately, and document activities and effects;
  • Involve all the stakeholders—for example, by involving current or former sex workers in the project team in Guinea.